CHEM 212 – Organic Chemistry II

  • Discipline(s): Chemistry, STEM

  • Credits: 3

  • Available: spring semester 2023

  • Instructor: Ted Metcalfe, Ph.D.

Description
This course follows on from Chemistry 210, which is a prerequisite. We will continue with spectroscopy to interpreter and understand the structure of organic molecules and them proceed to investigate the chemistry of carbonyl compounds, basic and acidic Polar reactions as well as those Pericyclic compounds. We will do this by understanding and applying the concepts of organic chemistry.

Objectives
• To interpret spectral data to determine/confirm organic compounds’ structures.
• To name carbonyl-containing compounds.
• To understand and predict the reactivities and properties of organic compounds, including carbonyl-containing compounds and how they are synthesized.
• To draw electron-pushing mechanisms of selected reactions and predict intermediate types based on reaction conditions.
• To apply a variety of reactions when designing the syntheses of organic compounds.
• To survey selected bio-organic molecules.
• To analyse the retro-synthetic analysis approach and the design of synthetic routes to selected compounds.

After completing this course, you will:
• Gain an appreciation for the practical aspect of spectroscopy for the use of structure determination.
• Be able to predict compound reactivity/function based on inspection of structure (identify electrophilic and nucleophilic sites within compounds).
• Be able to draw out and explain mechanisms of organic reactions for familiar and new polar acidic, polar basic, and pericyclic reactions.
• Recognize the connection of organic chemistry to everyday life (biological processes, food chemistry, pharmaceuticals).
• Acknowledge the importance of reactions and how they apply to the design of organic synthesis.

Course descriptions may be subject to occasional minor modifications at the discretion of the instructor.

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